Moringa against Malaria

Moringa Oleifera against Malaria

Moringa Oleifer a against Malaria

Study indicates that the phytochemicals derived from Moringa Oleifera seeds extracts are effective anti-mosquito agents.

Moringa Oleifera against Malaria, dengue is an important human viral disease transmitted by the yellow fever mosquito, is a mosquito that can spread dengue fever. 2-5 billion people living in tropical and subtropical countries, there are no specific antiviral drugs to treat it and no vaccines to prevent it. Or 3900 million people, in 128 countries, are at risk of infection with dengue viruses.
Symptoms of yellow fever include fever, headache, jaundice, muscle pain, nausea, vomiting and fatigue and more serious.

Studies, reported in the 2009, 2011, 2015 and 2016 that threatening diseases by malaria, yellow fever and dengue can be protected by the use of Moringa Oleifera.

2009 and 2011 they investigated the larvicidal effect of Moringa seed extract. The researchers found that this extract was toxic to the larvae of the yellow fever mosquito, an insect that spreads a number of diseases. On the other hand it was found that the extract was harmless to rats. The authors conclude that the seeds and their extract could be used in mosquito control programs. According to Michael Lea (Jal Mandir Technology Clearinghouse) in an e-conference organized by USAID, quote: “Moringa oil on a water tank will help kill mosquito larvae and thus reduce the threat of malaria and other deadly insect-borne diseases.”

Moringa Pods/Seeds Baca-Villa

Moringa Pods

Moringa-seeds-powder

Moringa Powder

Moringa Oleifera is not only a water treatment agent but also mosquitocidal agent. The seed extract of Moringa Oleifera will play an important role in the control of mosquitoes.
The present findings have important implications in the practical control of mosquito larvae in the polluted aquatic ecosystem. The plants studied are available in large quantities. These extracts are easy to handle, inexpensive and safe natural products for mosquito control.

A 2016 present study aims at exploring the larvicidal properties of aqueous extracts of leave, flower and fruit of Moringa Oleifera Lam. Larvicidal potential of leave, flower and fruit of Moringa Oleifera aqueous extracts were evaluated against third and fourth instar larvae (Aedes aegypti).

Conclusion: None of the aqueous extracts had found to possess larvicidal property. It can be concluded that, the aqueous extracts of leave, flower and fruit of Moringa Oleifera Lam are not suitable for larvicidal properties.

It’s cheap, single-step, and does not require high pressure, energy, temperature, and the use of highly toxic chemicals.

A number of hot areas that need further research and cooperation among parasitologists, entomologists, and behavioral ecologists are highlighted.

For more detailed analyses, evaluation and conclusion, please visit the reports:

2016 WORLD JOURNAL OF PHARMACY AND PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES
EVALUATION OF MORINGA OLEIFERA LAM LEAVES, FLOWERS AND FRUITS AQUEOUS EXTRACT FOR LARVICIDAL PROPERTY,
www.wjpps.com
Surendra Kumar. M.*, Astalakshmi. N., Anagha. CM., Aparna. P., Lulushad. N., Vijisha. CP. and Babu. G.
Volume 5, Issue 4, 1892-1896    
Research Article ISSN 2278 – 4357

Nanoparticles for mosquito control: challenges and constraints
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1018364716303421

Research in mosquito control: current challenges for a brighter future.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26093499
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3609168/

Larvicidal and repellent potential of Moringa oleifera against malarial vector, Anopheles stephensi Liston
(Insecta: Diptera: Culicidae).
http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0001-37652009000200007
Moringa seeds prevent Malaria, Zika, Dengue, Typhus, Yellow Fever & West Nile Virus.
Based on the 2009 Study “Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciencias”.
Paulo M.P. FerreiraI; Ana F.U. CarvalhoI; Davi F. FariasI; Nara G. CariolanoI; Vânia M.M. MeloI; Maria G.R.
QueirozII; Alice M.C. MartinsII; Joaquim G. Machado-NetoIII
IDepartamento de Biologia, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Av. Mister Hall s/n, 60455-970 Fortaleza, CE, Brasil
IIDepartamento de Análises Clínicas e Toxicológicas, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Rua Capitão Francisco
Pedro, 1200, 60430-270 Fortaleza, CE, Brasil
IIIDepartamento de Defesa Fitossanitária, Universidade Estadual Paulista Júlio de Mesquita Filho, Rod. Prof.
Paulo Donato Castellane s/n, 14870-000 Jaboticabal, SP, Brasil